The HSP Summer Session

Our Flagship Summer Program

Our flagship program, the HSP Summer Session gathers students from across the country annually for a two week summer intensive. Participants get the opportunity to take accredited, graduate level courses with some of the nations top Latinx faculty in an environment that centers Latinx methods, pedagogies, and stories.

About the Program

For over 30 years the HSP Summer Session has served as the cornerstone of the Hispanic Summer Program. For two-weeks, over 60 students from across the country convene to take accredited graduate level courses with some of the best Latinx faculty in the nation. Classes in history, theology, sociology, liturgy, ethics and the like are taught to a majority Latinx student body in a way that centers the intellectual and pedagogical traditions of the Latinx community. This mode of education emphasizes community while ensuring there is an explicit connection between the “mind and the heart.” At the end of two weeks students return to their institutions not just with three graduate credits, but with a community of scholars, mentors, and friends with whom they can continue building on the experiences they gained at the Summer Session.

The simple reality is that Latinx students in theological and higher education continue to be underrepresented in ATS institutions while the communities they go out to serve continue to grow. And most institutions of higher education that serve Masters level students don’t have programs focused on Latinx scholarship, ministry, and community engagement. By participating in the HSP Summer Session, students are not only exposed to a majority Latinx student body but to Latinx faculty and an intellectual tradition that stems from the Latinx community. Additionally, students are connected to mentors that can help encourage their pursuits after graduation. HSP students have gone on to pursue doctoral work, parish ministry, community organizing, non-profit administration, and more using the education they received at the HSP.

While the majority of our students are Masters level Latinxs, each year the HSP Summer Session welcomes a small number of non-Latinx participants and a few slots are made available to students currently enrolled in doctoral programs. Non-Latinx students at any level are invited to learn from the rich tradition of Latinx theological inquiry while seeking ways to expand their own cultural competencies and build coalitions with members of other communities. Doctoral students are encouraged to expand the scope of their research as they learn with brilliant Latinx faculty and colleagues from other institutions. Both groups benefit from the richness offered at the HSP Summer Session.

Tuition

The Summer Session takes place annually, hosted by a different institution. Tuition and what is included in that fee is as follows:

Who You Are Cost of Tuition What You Get
Masters level students from sponsoring institutions attending the Summer Session for the 1st or 2nd time In Person: $475
Online: $375
  • 3 Graduate Level Credits, transferable to your institution
  • The chance to study with some of the best Latinx faculty in the nation
  • Room and Board for the two week program (In Person Only)
  • Airfare to and from the two week program (In Person only)
Masters level students from sponsoring institutions attending the Summer Session for the 3rd time In Person: $800
Online: $475
  • 3 Graduate Level Credits, transferable to your institution
  • The chance to study with some of the best Latinx faculty in the nation
  • Room and Board for the two week program (In Person Only)
Masters level students from a non-sponsoring institution In Person: $800
Online: $475
  • 3 Graduate Level Credits, transferable to your institution
  • The chance to study with some of the best Latinx faculty in the nation
  • Room and Board for the two week program (In Person Only)
Doctoral level students (D.Min and Ph.D.) from sponsoring and non-sponsoring institutions In Person: $900
Online: $475
  • 3 Graduate Level Credits, transferable to your institution
  • The chance to study with some of the best Latinx faculty in the nation
  • Room and Board for the two week program (In Person Only)

HSP Summer Session 2022

Location

Where: Duke Divinity School
Date: June 18 – July 2, 2022

Applications are Due February 15, 2022. Apply Below.

Course Descriptions

Dr. Leticia Guardiola-Saenz

Dr. Leticia Guardiola-Saenz

Seattle University

Latinx Hermeneutics and The New Testament

Using a chronological study of the 27 documents of the New Testament using a variety of Latinx Hermeneutical approaches we will trace the dramatic evolution of the Christian message that took place between 49 and 130 CE. Special attention will be given to the formation of Latinx hermeneutics, the readers’ social locations, and the ways in which the historical context of the first century shaped the content of the Christian Scriptures.

Dr. Felipe Hinojosa

Dr. Felipe Hinojosa

Texas A & M University

Religion and the Latina/o Freedom Movement

In this course, we will explore the major ideas, movements, and events that shaped the Latina/o freedom movement, from civil rights in the 1960s to sanctuary politics in the 1980s. We will look closely at the intersections of religion and politics within the broader social contexts of deindustrialization, urban renewal, im/migration, refugee policies, and the Chicana/o and Puerto Rican freedom movements. Moreover, this course will take a relational approach to Latina/o history by focusing on the political coalitions Latina/os forged with progressive whites and other communities of color in the U.S. This approach will necessarily take us across the country and across borders—from rural to urban contexts—as we collectively examine the multiple ways Latina/os claimed dignity and practiced a politics of the possible.

Dr. Cláudio Carvalhaes

Dr. Cláudio Carvalhaes

Union Theological Seminary – New York City

Indigenous Thinking Through the Americas: Colloquium on Preaching and Worship

This course will engage the thinking of Indigenous Peoples from North, Central and South Americas. We will start with the “doctrine of discovery” and the name América and go through some of the works of indigenous thinkers such as Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui, Vine Deloria Jr., Rigoberta Menchu, George E. “Tink” Tinker, Ailton Krenak, Winona LaDuke, Robin Wall Kimmerer, David Kopenawa, Nick Estes and Tyson Yunkaporta. More than ever, we need to learn how to relate with the earth and follow the law of the land. Learning with these thinkers, we will see how these cosmologies challenge our theologies, our preaching and our liturgical practices.

Dr. Harold D. Morales

Dr. Harold D. Morales

Morgan State University

Religion & Cities: Racial Inequities and Justice Oriented Work

In this course we will examine ecological relationships between Religion and Cities in Baltimore as a case study with broad relevance. We will explore both the ways in which religion and cities have contributed to racial inequities and also how they have inspired justice-oriented work. Through these lenses, we will assess models for community engagement and liberation.

Rev. Dr. Cristian De La Rosa

Rev. Dr. Cristian De La Rosa

Boston University School of Theology

Our Lady of Guadalupe as a Resource for el Pueblo

This course will consider the contextual dynamics of power and agency that contributed to the establishment of Our Lady of Guadalupe as a powerful symbol for diverse communities across chronological and geographical boundaries. Students will explore narratives, rituals, and faith practices in relation to political activism within the historical context in which the image serves as a powerful symbolic resource in the struggles of marginalized communities. Facilitated through a protestant feminist /Mujerista perspective, this course will explore the image of Our Lady of Guadalupe as a fluctuating symbolic site of power communicating an indigenous model of political agency for el Pueblo. This course will be run in a seminar style with the instructor as facilitator for critical engagement of readings, sharing of experiences, and contextual deconstruction/construction of methods, theories, and ‘official” historical understanding.

LANGUAGE POLICY: SPANISH/ENGLISH: This course will be bilingual Spanish/English.

Dr. José Morales

Dr. José Morales

Chicago Theological Seminary

Theological Anthropology, Race, and Negotiating Identity

In ¿Existe una filosofía de nuestra América?, the Peruvian Augusto Sálazar Bondy asks what defines Latin American philosophy. His provisional answer is thematic, positing that Latin American philosophy is haunted by the unanswered question of identity: What do we mean by “latinoamericana” or “caribeño” or “americana” (in the continental sense)? The elusive quest for identity is exacerbated by migration to the United States, wherein the variegated, pan-cultural, multiracial ethnicities of Latin America and the Caribbean are abridged into the racialized classification of color—“black”, “white”, “brown.” As a result, Latinx persons and communities are forced into the tragic position of making what philosopher Leopoldo Zea calls malas copias (“bad copies”) of our identities. Moreover, theological anthropologies inherited from the North Atlantic usually are inept with regards to negotiating identity: they too are malas copias. This course is a critical and exploratory conversation between philosophies of race/identity and theological anthropology.

Apply for the HSP Summer Session

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